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The first step is to consider your niche and the content relevant to that niche.

Content is not about your product or services. Content is about educating, engaging, helping, and informing your readers to build relationships, not sell your stuff.

This may sound counterproductive, but content is establishing relationships to build trust. Would you buy something from someone you don’t know or engage in a business deal with someone you don’t know? Then why should your readers?

The art of selling online is building trust through establishing relationships, not trying to sell your product or service to everyone that visits your site. You start by helping them through their pain point first before you try and sell.

I may be in the minority, but I believe in helping visitors to my blog and social sites over trying to sell them my services. I am willing to answer questions or offer suggestions to everyone; do you.

Don’t use jargon or large words in conjunction with complex sentences when plain English will suffice. Readers of your content should get the point you are making with ease by the use of concise writing.

Content marketing involves all content from social sites, blogs, and websites with relevant content to your product or services. Your content is your chance to position yourself as an expert in your niche and build trust with your traffic by engaging with visitors.

Your content must be relevant to what people are searching for by using search engines. Also, remember, nothing happens overnight. It takes some time to build a following and trust. If you expect instant sales, you are going to be disappointed.

Be engaging and helpful first before trying to sell products or services. A chance for you to talk more about your product or services is via newsletters when a visitor signs up for it on your site.

Content marketing might be an email if visitors opt in to receiving emails for special sells or special coupons or email only products or services and have an easy way to opt out of emails.

Send a free item if they opt-in to receiving a newsletter or emails. Many people like getting something free, and are probably willing to share their email address with you to receive it.

Free should mean free, not free if they pay shipping and handling. Something you can send an electronic copy of, and always be courteous with a thank you note when the sign up to your list of people willing to receive your emails or newsletter.

This is how to run your content marketing.

Author

Robert Medak

Freelance writer, Blogger, Editor, Proofreader and Reviewer learning marketing

Words are labels for the things we see and the things we feel. Without such labels we are lost or at least confused.” ~ Garrad Beck

Words are important. If you cannot say what you mean, you will never mean what you say. And you should always mean what you say.”

Paraphrased from the film, The Last Emperor

Written by Mark Peploe & Bernardo Bertolucci

(The line was based on a quotation from George Bernard Shaw.)

Everyone wishing to write needs to work on their vocabulary by reading all manner of the written word from periodicals, books, and even the lexicon.

As Mark Twain said, “The difference between the almost right word & the right word is really a large matter–it’s the difference between the lightning bug and the lightning.” 

It behooves every writer to grow their vocabulary and not always rely on the same words when writing for the web, poetry, or prose.

Writers by nature must also be avid readers. While listening to Ray Bradbury speaking at a meeting of the writers group, Southwest Manuscriptors, Mr. Bradbury told everyone in attendance to read everything they could get their hands on, the classics, good writing, and even bad writing.

By reading the work of others, it is that writers learn how to write. By reading, do writers find out how to construct sentences, learn tenses, and fine tune consistency while writing.

Commanding a large vocabulary comes with a caveat. The responsibility to use words that intelligibly and distinctly convey your meaning to the reader. You must choose your words wisely from your vocabulary that is well suited for the educational level of the reader.

When writing for most audiences, forget using jargon, use plain English unless you are writing about technology to engineers, or a legal paper read by attorneys. Your language must fit the audience.

During the 1960s, Army technical manuals were written for a person with only an eighth grade education.

With knowledge comes great responsibility in using said knowledge wisely.

Author

Robert Medak

Freelance Writer, Blogger, Editor, Proofreader, and Reviewer learning ethical Marketing

Follow the author: http://xeeme.com/RobertMedak

Subscribe to my Paper.li: Freelance Writer 

If you need help making your copy better or have any questions, please use my contact form and we will work together.

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